World Languages: Lachixío Zapotec

A low hanging mist pushes its way through forests and mountains. The aftermath of a seasonal rainstorm can still be felt in the damp of the air and in the sound of water dripping from leaves. Although many trees still stand strong and true there are scars of land that have been emptied.

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World Languages: Paku Karen

Amongst all of the natural landscape and life residing in the Kayin State of Myanmar lives the speakers of Paku Karen.

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World Languages: Maká

Born out of the Matacoan language group which can be heard accross Argentina, Bolivia and Paraguay, the Maká language has stayed strong in its usage over the years. The language is currently classified as vigorous in its usage among its 1,500 ethnic population and 600 monolinguals.

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World Languages: Ivatan

Harsh storms may plague the Batanes Islands regularly but it is just a way of life for the Ivatan people who reside on the small islands situated between Taiwan and Luzon, the largest island of the Philippines. It is unknown how long the Ivatan people have lived on the islands but their way of life has been made in harmony with the land and sea since the beginning.

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World Languages: Teanu

A rainbow may depict all of the colours that could possibly exist but some places display all of the intricate possibilities of a single colour. That is the case for the island of Vanikoro which is within the Santa Cruz Island group in the Solomon Islands. It is here in this remote paradise that every form of green can be found. From the blue greens of water and coral to the deep lush greens of a canopy of trees, all of the varieties of green are laid out for the eyes to take in and absorb.

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World Languages: Squamish

Let’s take a journey…

Mount Garibaldi makes its presence known in the distance as it rises off to touch the clouds and the 335 meter tall Shannon Falls crash into rocks and deep blue waters as its waters makes their decent. If you made your way to the summit of the Stawamus Chief you w....Read the Full Article


Language of the Day: Andaman Creole Hindi

The waters of the Bay of Bengal surround this lush archipelago which rests off of the coast of India and Myanmar. There are 325 islands in the grouping and their shores are touches with the white sand of the tropics. The sun never ceases to bathe the land in heat and rains are usually uncommon leading to a dry warm air that is made pleasant by the moisture that coalesces with the wind as it sways across the Bay of Bengal and onto the many islands.

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Language of the Day: Cornish

There is a strong damp wind blowing from the west. It’s the breeze that rises from the waves of the Atlantic Ocean’s Celtic Sea and is salty and cold. This breeze shapes the land which comes to a point in the south where the Celtic Sea meets the English Channel. The high waves of these frigid unfriendly waters splash up on high cliffs which stand straight true leading to the spindly and rocky interior.

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Language of the Day: Chin, Chinbon

There is rain falling from the low lying clouds. It falls it torrents and it is warm as it runs along your skin. Mountains spread in all directions but they are covered in dark green trees from valley to crest as they go from India and Bangladesh in the west to China, Loas and Thailand in the East. The Indian Ocean lays to the south past more emerald mountains. In the distance there are some mountains who wear hats of white as they stand above all those other mountains around them. They are giants and they make the others look like hills.

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Language of the Day: Trinidadian Creole English

It’s warm but there is a nice salty breeze blowing. There are the usual signs of the tropics: sun kissed skin, palm trees and sandy beaches are all around; this is a place that you would visit on a vacation. The water is warm and it is that clear light blue that can only be found in the waves of the Caribbean. There is a multitude of islands speckling the waters but we find ourselves focused on two which sit at the precipice of the North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Paria.

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Language of the Day: Iaai

Like the moon at most times during its cycle the island is in the shape of a crescent. Surrounded by sandy white beaches that drift into the Pacific Ocean this picturesque island is just a small piece of a larger group of islands. The lush green of vegetation covers the ground which stretches for 50 Km in length and 7 Km in width.

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Language of the Day: Goundo

The heat of the Sahara Desert lays to the south but it is not where we find ourselves. There is no place for sand in the Sudanian Savanah which is covered in the light green of grasses and shrubs. Within these grasses thrives many different animals, including many species of birds, reptiles and large mammals. There are also a number of rivers which flow through leading their way to the north where they empty into Lake Chad.

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Language of the Day: Waris

Born out of a collision between the Indo-Australian Plate and the Pacific plate, the snow-capped Maoke Mountains range from the west to the east, its ten peaks reaching up 4000 metres into the sky. As the mountains slowly fall away into grassy and river infested hills they become lowlands which are blanketed in the lush greens of an ancient rainforest and pocked with low lying swamps.

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Language of the Day: Kurdish, Northern

The air you breathe is arid and the sun beats down making the ground hot to the touch and your skin warm. The land is mostly covered in light brown sand which comes together in dunes which look like the frozen waves of a great sea. The sand sways with the passing wind which picks up grains as it dances through the desert carrying its passengers from the Mediterranean in the west to India and central Asia in the east. While there is not much water there are a number of lakes speckling the land and a couple major rivers which twist and turn their way through the sands.

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Language of the Day: Maasai

To the west rests Lake Victoria the second largest fresh water lake in the world, named after Queen Victoria who was the presiding Queen of England when it was discovered. To the east, where the sun rises signalling a new day is the great Indian Ocean whose waters touch the shores of Australia, Africa and Asia. The land between the fresh water lake to the west and the ocean to the east is filled with dense forests and mountains. Along this line rises the monstrous Mount Kilimanjaro who peaks at around six thousand metres above sea level.

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Language of the Day: Ede Ije

From the Niger River on its northern border all the way down to where it meets the Atlantic Ocean the land is a mixture of coastal plains, marshy lagoons, and Guinean forest-savanna mosaic-covered plateaus and valleys. Stuck in the middle of Togo and Nigeria this small mostly tropical African country has little to no elevation until the northern border and is sparsely populated.

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Language of the Day: Acholi

Down to a place to a place where the White Nile snakes its way from the northern border down to the southern border, segmenting the tropical forest and swamp covered land in half. The borders of Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, the Congo, and the Central African Republic enclose this newly minted country within the confines of Central Africa. This country is new, having only gained its independence in 2011 from its northern neighbour, Sudan.

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Language of the Day: Sãotomense

The weekend may be over but we are heading out to a tropical island. Rising mountains with streaming rivers cover the central part of the island and are surrounded by with shores which are covered in the light coloured sand that is warm to the touch all year around. To the east are the waters of the Gulf of Guinea shortly followed by western Africa and right at the southern tip of the island lays the equator meaning that the island basks in the heat of the sun from January to December.

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Language of the Day: Kaba Naa, Sara

From north to south we see a duality of environments. In the north lays the sweeping sands of the desert, a place that sees little rain and moisture and to the south the ground is covered in the greens of plant life, it is fertile and habitable. In the central area we see a transition area as the desert moves into the fertile lands to the south this is the area where Lake Chad begins, the namesake for the country we find ourselves in.

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Language of the Day: Wayoró

The landscape may be covered in the patchwork of farms but it used to be filled with trees wider than you or I can hug. Leaves would spread out from the branches of these trees creating a dark green canopy above and as the rain fell, as it did more often than naught, it would be caught by this canopy. The air is humid and the wide Madeira River snakes its way through the state along with numerous other rivers.

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